The futility of oppression in Iran

Caption: A protester holds a portrait of Mahsa Amini during a demonstration protesting her death at the hands of Iran's morality police PHOTO: AFP
Caption: A protester holds a portrait of Mahsa Amini during a demonstration protesting her death at the hands of Iran's morality police PHOTO: AFP

Sometime between June and July of 1848, at a conference in the city of Bedasht, in the Semnan Province of Iran, a Babi poet and revolutionary named Fatimih Baraghani Tahirih dared to appear unveiled in front of 80 men.

Tahirih lived during the Qajar Dynasty, when women were ignorant, illiterate, and kept hidden from the public gaze – a milieu marked by totalitarianism, dogmatism, and unquestionable patriarchy in its most severe forms.

Tahirih's intellectual abilities, eloquence, poetic talents, insatiable curiosity, and unwavering courage made her one of the rarest women of her time – a result of the wishes of her father (an Islamic scholar of Qazvin) to educate his beloved daughter within the confines of his own library. Tahirih's audacity to do the unthinkable – her fearless action of presenting herself to her male companions without her veil – may have been a rude awakening for many who were unwilling to.

Editor's Comment
CoA brings sanity to DIS/DCEC long-standing feud

This decision follows the raiding of the office of the former Director General of the DCEC, Tymon Katlholo early 2022 and his staff officer by the DIS operatives who reportedly took files that they had targeted.After all back and forth arguments, the CoA has set the record straight giving an invaluable lesson to the DIS that it was no super security organ and it does not have any powers to cogently supervise other security organs including the...

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