City life or farm life: When elephants adapt to different human development

On the march: Wildlife corridors are designed to provide animals with a path through human activity PIC: DR TEMPE ADAMS
On the march: Wildlife corridors are designed to provide animals with a path through human activity PIC: DR TEMPE ADAMS

KASANE: New research led by Elephants Without Borders (EWB) has discovered that elephant movement through wildlife corridors is directly impacted by differing forms of human pressures and development.

KASANE: New research led by Elephants Without Borders (EWB) has discovered that elephant movement through wildlife corridors is directly impacted by differing forms of human pressures and development.

From 2012 to 2019, EWB monitored elephants’ movements through six wildlife corridors with the use of motion-detected camera traps in two different human-dominated landscapes: the townships of Kasane and Kazungula, and the farming villages of the Chobe Enclave, both located in the Chobe District. The study, published this week in Frontiers in Conservation, provides new information revealing that various land-use seemingly affects when elephants use wildlife corridors on an hourly basis.

Editor's Comment
A step in the right direction

That is indeed a welcome development, especially looking at the fact that the manual way of doing things is slowly disappearing and competency in the use of computers and other digital gadgets has become a must.The simple way of looking at it is just an example that almost all companies have gone completely digital and school leavers will be better placed after leaving school, because they will already be familiar with the use of computers.The...

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