Author

Jeff Ramsay
  • Chobe District (4)

    In our last instalment we had noted that, following Sebetwane’s death, the Makololo kingdom declined during the reign of his son Sekeletu, who had succeeded his father following a brief regency by his elder sister Dikuku or MmaMotsisane...

  • The Boers Retreat

    Temporarily abandoned by his BagaMmanaana and Bangwaketse allies the Mokwena's position must have initially appeared desperate. From their later reports it is clear that in the immediate aftermath of the battle both he and Scholtz were painfully...

  • The guns of Dimawe

    The weapons in both camps were mostly the private property of those who carried them resulting in a good deal of qualitative variation in the munitions deployed by each side.The Boers enjoyed a quantitative advantage in terms of artillery,...

  • CHOBE DISTRICT (3)

    In our last instalment we had noted that the venerable Makololo monarch Sebetwane reached out to Dikgosi Letsholathebe, Sechele, and Sekgoma to request that the road to his kingdom be opened to the Europeans in return for access to the hunting...

  • Chobe District (2)

    In our last instalment we had noted that by the 1600s Vekuhane settlement in the middle of Zambezi-Chobe-Linyandi (or Linyanti) region had led to the establishment of Intenge polity under a ruler named Ikuhane who was the son of Intenge, who thus...

  • Chobe District (1)

    Over the centuries, the area has served as a crossroads linking the wealth of central and southern Africa across the Chobe and Zambezi rivers. It has thus evolved as a meeting place of unique cultural diversity as well as natural wonders. This...

  • When Batswana marched on Rome

    During the Council meeting, which had begun in the evening of July 24, Mussolini was tired, unwell, and seemingly overwhelmed by Italian military reverses.Council member Dino Grandi argued that the dictatorship had brought Italy to the brink of...

  • We ask for bread you give us stones!

    Keaboka was accompanied by five others, being: Peto Sekgoma, who had spearheaded support for Seretse, Kobe Baitswe, the Headman of Seleka village who further represented Letswapong, Moutlwatsi Mpotokwane from Tonota who served as the Supervisor of...

  • Seretse Khama's 1958 vision

    In hindsight, it is clear that by the time of his return to Botswana in 1956 his perspective had been broadened by his years of struggle in exile. The young, somewhat impulsive Mongwato Prince who had been denied his throne returned to his people...

  • When Batswana Marched On Rome

    During the Council meeting, which had begun in the evening of July 24, Mussolini was tired, unwell, and seemingly overwhelmed by Italian military reverses. Council member Dino Grandi argued that the dictatorship had brought Italy to the brink of...

  • We Ask For Bread You Give Us Stones!

    The delegation’s leader was Kgosi Keaboka Kgamane, who in April 1950 had reluctantly agreed to serve under the British as “Senior Tribal Representative” following the couple’s banishment. Keaboka was accompanied by five...

  • Birth Of The BDP

    For his part, the British Resident Commissioner, Peter Fawcus, considered Seretse and Ketumile Masire to be the Councils’ outstanding members. Privately he confided to Seretse that having Masire as a partner was the key to building a national...

  • Seretse Khama's 1958 Vision

    The young, somewhat impulsive Mongwato Prince who had been denied his throne returned to his people with a budding vision for the nation he would come to lead and its role in the region. Revered at birth among his morafe, in the decade leading up to...

  • Seretse Khama Centenary: A profile of our first president

    Seretse Khama was born on July 1, 1921 at Serowe in what was then the Bangwato Tribal Reserve of the Bechuanaland Protectorate. He was the son and heir of Sekgoma Khama and Tebogo (nee Kebailele). In 1923, his father succeeded his grandfather as the...

  • Times' Pitso

    On July 20-21 of 1909, Colonial Secretary Lord Crewe held secret talks with the official South African delegates. In his opening remarks, he made it clear that members of the government “were prepared to see the Bill through both as to...

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