Human stories of the Okavango, storytellers wanted

On set: The author, Thalefang Charles, 
caught during production of the film PIC: BOSE BONDA
On set: The author, Thalefang Charles, caught during production of the film PIC: BOSE BONDA

Last year, I earned the title “National Geographic Explorer,” but I’ve mostly been exploring my own backyard. And a question I always ask is, “why do people live here?”

My country, Botswana, and particularly the Okavango Delta, has been the subject of several nature and wildlife films. But rarely do these films feature people. And almost never do these films acknowledge our people for their role in protecting our water, nature, and wildlife since the beginning of time.

On my journey to tell stories of the people of the Okavango, I have gotten to know some of these legendary humans, including one of the region's revered medicine men, former safari guides, and elders from our indigenous communities. They are all “living libraries” of the Delta and its traditions.

Editor's Comment
Parents should be more proactive in children’s lives

Parents need to pay particular attention to their children to ensure they grow up in a healthy environment that supports their development and mental health. Healthy attachments between parents and children foster strong bonds, creating a solid foundation for future leaders.In many African cultures, there is a common perception that parents should use a stick to discipline naughty children. While disciplining children is important, it is equally...

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