How our culture normalises human trafficking

Poverty and hardships often drive cultural human trafficking PIC: MORERI SEJAKGOMO
Poverty and hardships often drive cultural human trafficking PIC: MORERI SEJAKGOMO

Imagine a scenario where you meet a foreigner who pretends to be in love with you and takes you on vacation to Dubai, only to find yourself sold for prostitution. Or how about you’re living in the village and your aunt in the city takes you in as an unpaid babysitter and maid? Which one of these two is human trafficking? Well, both writes Mmegi Correspondent NNASARETHA KGAMANYANE

Technically, human trafficking is defined as the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receiving of another person by means of threat or use of force or other forms of coercion.

It also involves abduction, use of fraud or deception, abuse of power or abuse of a position of vulnerability. It can include the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person for the purpose of exploitation of that person.

Editor's Comment
Parents should be more proactive in children’s lives

Parents need to pay particular attention to their children to ensure they grow up in a healthy environment that supports their development and mental health. Healthy attachments between parents and children foster strong bonds, creating a solid foundation for future leaders.In many African cultures, there is a common perception that parents should use a stick to discipline naughty children. While disciplining children is important, it is equally...

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