SUKHI 222 Clean Water programme reaches Botswana

Partnership for good: From far right, Kgosi Serumola, Basadi Keorapetse from SUKHI and Kgosi Joel as well as Isabel Gobela and Bonang Mosholombe both from SUKHI
Partnership for good: From far right, Kgosi Serumola, Basadi Keorapetse from SUKHI and Kgosi Joel as well as Isabel Gobela and Bonang Mosholombe both from SUKHI

A small shipment of water filters capable of preventing the spread of cholera, typhoid, and other bacterial illnesses recently arrived in Botswana as part of a pilot project supported by Sukhi 222 International in partnership with Dadek Orphanage Home .

Sukhi 222 officials said the 24 Sawyer filters will be installed in schools, clinics, cattle posts and fields. The first phase of the water filters’ deployment will start in the Bobirwa region, in Molalatawana and a few cattle posts over the next weeks, led by Isabel Zibusiso Gobela, Moribame Ronald Moribame and Sukhi 222 champions.

“This small project will demonstrate what cooperation and the use of available technology can do to impact the access to clean water for over 1,000 people,” said Charles Holsopple, the founder of Sukhi 222.

He stressed that it is critical for the filters to be properly maintained by members of the community so that they can continue using them for the next 10 years and benefit the most people possible.


Sukhi 222 International is a collection of people and associations who realise all human beings are better off if everyone has access, with dignity, to clean water, secure shelter, and nutritious food.

In establishing a local Sukhi 222 chapter, Botswana joins 16 other countries carrying out similar water filter projects. Filter installation by Sukhi222 teams in Rwanda, Nigeria, Uganda, Malawi, Pakistan, Tanzania, Nepal, Ghana, Kenya and Cameroon have recently been completed. In Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Sudan, DRC and South Africa, chapters are preparing for the filters’ distribution.

Holsopple said his vision is to incubate Sukhi 222 chapters in every country and help create jobs while expanding the filter programme to the scale required.

“This is one pillar of a global strategy to allocate more resources to food, water, and shelter. “These small water filter projects are evidence of what is required and what is possible if Phase 2 is funded. “The pilot has revealed that the cost of deploying the filters can be reduced to $50 per filter while helping provide local jobs,” he said.

Editor's Comment
More resources needed to fight crime

The Fight Crime Gaborone Facebook page is always filled with sad complaints of hard working Batswana who were robbed at knife point at some traffic lights or at their home gates when trying to get inside.These thugs have no mercy; they do not just threaten victims, they are always ready to use knives, and sadly, they damage car windows. While this happens at different traffic lights, there are those where such incidents happen more frequently...

Have a Story? Send Us a tip
arrow up