Mmegi Online :: Only if Stan Tshosane was a foreigner... maybe of a white race?
Banners
Banners
Banners
Banners
Last Updated
Monday 22 October 2018, 11:52 am.
Banners
Only if Stan Tshosane was a foreigner... maybe of a white race?

I join a long queue of glory hunters all over Botswana in congratulating Stan Tshosane, for single handedly delivering us to the Promised Land at last.
By Staff Writer Mon 22 Oct 2018, 19:53 pm (GMT +2)
Mmegi Online :: Only if Stan Tshosane was a foreigner... maybe of a white race?








To understand and appreciate the furore arising from the Zebras maiden appearance at African Cup of Nations (AFCON) - football's most coveted prize, one has to look back to when it was first held; 1957, that is even before we had a flag of our own, but this is beside the point, I am getting carried away. I use "single-handedly" deliberately, because football's own weird logic dictates that, when a team performs badly, it's the manager's sole fault, but when the fortunes are good, very few managers had been able to steal the limelight from their players, unless you are Jose Morinho. Using those premises, I therefore see no reason why I should apologise for viewing the Zebras' qualification as Stan Tshosane's singular miracle.

Lost in the ecstasy of triumph is the fact that Stan Tshosane was not everyone's choice at the beginning, let me rephrase that; Tshosane won the post by default because we could not afford a high profile foreign coach, the type of one Jeff Butler, who legend has it that he became unpopular with our players after offering to teach them how to control a moving ball or "go trepa" in Tswanglish. The BFA can spin it however way they like on this subject, but I was not born yesterday, and so is the case with most Batswana.

To those who are familiar with Hollywood movies, Matthew McCounaughey's character, in A Time To Kill, defends a black man about to be condemned to death in racist Mississippi, after killing  two  scumbags who had gang raped his 10-year-old daughter. He (McCounaughey's character) asks the jury to listen to a narrative about a girl who was raped; mirroring the story of his client's daughter, in his final comment he asks the jury to imagine how his client would fare if the daughter in question had been ...white.

Upon hearing that Botswana had won in Ndjamena making them  the first African team to qualify for 2012, I could not help but fall into a strange trance, and found myself seeing things awkwardly, like; how different this victory would be had Stan Tshosane been a foreigner of say ... the white race? In this fantasy, he even appears as Stan Tshosavic, to sound exotic I suppose. I imagine the gates of praise words swung open from Chobe to Pitsane, I can almost see him being honored with the Keys to Gaborone City, I can almost hear a fanatic MP tabling a motion to have one road named after him.

I clearly see the UB honoring him with a string of honorary doctorates of letters. I could swear I almost feel the spirit of community being activated as ordinary people queue up to donate goats, chickens, dogs and everything else which may be deemed worthy for a hero. I see the BFA offering to triple his salary way before he could even ask, and pleading with him to commit to a contract, which will tie him to the national team for the next decade. I also see endorsement packages coming his way as the corporate world fight for the spillover from this new found celebrity. In Nyangabgwe and even in the tiny clinic of my Mosojane village, I hear women naming their newborns after him. Well....Stan is just a local guy right?

I am not really pointing fingers here; I am just saying, Stan Tshosane is a local

Banners

lad. We know him, what is the big deal? We know how he grew up, we know his humble beginnings. If we give him his due glory he might be richer than us, you see? A real sane Motswana would rather have a stranger prosper than acknowledge one of ours. It is in our nature to find excuses and fail to see the greatness that is in our people. Those who are into football statistics argue that, in the history of FIFA world cup tournaments no foreign manager had ever succeeded, put plainly it suggests that all nations which believe in foreign managers have so far failed to justify why they shun their homegrown talent. I am aware of foreign managers who have done miracles elsewhere, and I sincerely hope that one day we too can have substantial representation abroad in that regard. I am aware all the same of the immense contribution and solid foundation laid by Tshosane's predecessors, most of whom happened to be foreigners.

I pay tribute to the vision laid down by Ben Kofi. I still relish the respect which Jelusic Veselin earned us in the continent.
How can I forget the jubilation of drawing against Egypt with Colwyn Rowe? I am however of the opinion that, at times we as a country suffer from a lethargic inferiority complex. It is almost as if it is part of our psyche to shun against  home-grown talent, which ironically comes at relatively low cost.

It is not only an issue of football, by the way. What is the purpose, I have always wondered, of seeking expensive legal advice from a certain chap who just happens to have a title  of "Advocate" in South Africa, when we can get the same from "Mokaloba & Associates" in phase 2 at just a fraction of the bill? Nor have I ever understood the rationale behind hiring a political consultant from overseas to come and lecture to us, not cheaply, what we could read for free on Log Raditlhokwa's column. The most bizarre of these situations was when some time ago a consultant, somebody told me, was brought from Canada on issues of "Sangoma and traditional medicines in Botswana", you would have thought we should be the ones importing that.

 I have digressed enough, I retract a few words I said earlier at the beginning, this is not a "single-handed" victory, we all played part. We shall take collective responsibility from now on by the look of things, even when the Zebras are back to their losing ways, God Forbid!

We will still fill the stadium in numbers, for we know, we are by and large a team still wanting in the ranks of professionalism. We will stop the habit of being seasonal in our support. The funds and remuneration still will be available even when the team is going through rough patches.

Lastly, let the qualification be an inspiration to the nation which had been accustomed to failure, and gotten used to underperforming as if it was a birthright.

It should be a reminder that we too have what it takes to showcase in the global stage. The only worry is that this team has been around for so long that I worry they may be on the wrong side of 30.  The next two games should give Tshosane the flexibility to experiment.

Tshepo Nthoi
Dublin

Subscribe to our Newsletter
Banners
Banners
Banners


Banners
Banners
Subscribe to our Newsletter
have a story? Send us a Tip
Banners
  • Previous
    Next
    Masa Centre
    ::: Monday 22 Oct - Monday 22 Oct :::
  • Previous
    Next
    Riverwalk
    ::: Monday 22 Oct - Monday 22 Oct :::
  • Previous
    Next
    Gamecity
    ::: Monday 22 Oct - Monday 22 Oct :::
Selefu
Serowe
Banners
Banners
istanbul escort