Vol.22 No.163

Tuesday 25 October 2005    

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Opinion/Letters
Unravelling the veto puzzle
The Perm Five (The five permanent members of the Security Council) alone can exercise a veto, that is the right to negate decisions of the UN General Assembly, or the Security Council. This curious power relations in a democratic institution, where all states have voting parity, regardless of population size, is puzzling and absurd. Liechtenstein, with a population of less than 30,000, has one vote, like The People's Republic of China with a population of over 1.3 billion, and then you have one state with the right and power to upset a decision of 190 states? The UN leads the world democratisation process; forget the USA, despite its attempt to export democracy by force, harness dollar diplomacy or impose economic sanctions in its democratisation crusade. The UN, through suave diplomatic missions and ground level agency operations, dispenses humanitarian aid and promotes democracy in many fields. Why then does the UN hang on to an obsolete mechanism of the veto to regulate its political and administrative agendas? What criterion or criteria apply to make the Perm 5, the Perm 5?

Forced relocation of Basarwa a major concern
Namibia's National Society for Human Rights (NSHR) remains concerned about allegations of systematic persecution of Gana and Gwi Bushman (that is to say- San) peoples of the Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR).

Government commercialises education
The BDP government has failed dismally to come up with strategies that can resuscitate our fading economy. Opposition parties have long advocated that the system should try not to export jobs that is to say polishing and cutting diamonds are obvious political clinch monotonously articulated by political commentators.

BCP Voters gone AWOL
The past Gaborone West North by-election has gone by and passed. The Botswana Democratic Party (BDP) lost to the Botswana National Front (BNF) candidate Otsweletse Moupo who campaigned under the banner of a combined opposition. Otsweletse Moupo polled 3723 votes to the Robert Masitara's 2330 votes. In the past general elections, the BNF's Paul Rantao won by a margin of 621, having polled 3936 to the BDP's Limited Nkani who polled 3315.

  

 
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